Morgan Lambert
Graphic Design


Morgan Lambert (American, b. 2000) focuses on deconstructing and reevaluating societal structures and mapping invisible connections through extensive historical and visual research. She enjoys expressing her sense of humor through design and finding the odd ways in which the world connects and operates. Her practice includes a wide range of principles and mediums such as illustration, print, analog, infographics, video, and animation. Lambert is currently interested in visual identity and branding, as she is enthusiastic about problem-solving and the idea of establishing one’s identity. Lambert will receive her BFA in graphic design from the University of Tennessee in Chattanooga in the Spring of 2022 and afterward will continue working with local businesses in Chattanooga. She has participated in exhibitions such as Arts Build’s Will/Aspire Spring Exhibition and the 2022 BFA Senior Thesis Exhibition at the Institute of Contemporary Art at UTC.





Artist Statement:

We now consume at an unprecedented pace.

Brands and companies are spending millions of dollars for mere seconds of our attention. With one glance at a logo or an ad, we can learn a lot about a brand – its values, its product, and its mission.

Going on a date is now just a swipe away. Swiping through a sea of profiles, they are all competing for your attention. They show you a snapshot of their personality – or the most interesting version of it – through just a few pictures and sentences. Based on this, we make snap judgments about who these people are and if we are compatible with them.

These style guides are just a glance of who these profiles appear to be – their values, their story, and how they communicate through form and language. Do you have a vibrant color palette? Do you have a bold, geometric typeface, or are you more of a timeless serif? We market ourselves on a daily basis through swift and trivial interactions. We communicate who we are through our clothes, our language, and even our dating profiles. Can our identity be reduced down to a few hundred words in a Tinder bio? A logo?